TU NO ESTAS SOLO O SOLA EN ESTE MUNDO SI TE GUSTO UN ARTICULO, COMPARTELO, ENVIALO A LAS REDES SOCIALES TWITTER O FACEBOOK

trabajemos por una mejor matríz energética en chile

lunes, 29 de marzo de 2010

Biofuels Digest



  • March 29, 2010 | Administrator | Comments 0

    Send the Marines: 17 Steps the US military is taking to advance, use, and advocate for biofuels

    usmilitaryWhat is a US President to do in an era where Congress is stymied, budget deficits have limited the power of the US public purse, and an economic meltdown has limited the power of project finance and private money?

    As Tom Lehrer wrote in 1965, "When someone makes a move / Of which we don't approve,
    Who is it that always intervenes?/ U.N. and O.A.S. / They have their place, I guess / But first send the Marines!"

    Indeed, both Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama have done so, orchestrating a sweeping revamp of energy strategy at the Department of Defense — where a new generation of leaders cite benefits such as these when they tout the features of biofuels:

    1. Saving lives – as many as one in six military casualties occur in the delivery ugh supplies — of which the most dangerous is fuel.

    2. Reducing the complexity and length of supply lines. Fuel and waste disposal create a tremendous burden of risk, cost and hassle on the military — trucks, ships, rail and more are utilized in fuel delivery to bases as well as forward areas, and military officials have cited the cost of fuel delivered to the battlefield as high as $418 per gallon. Bioenergy — which can be grown strategically on or near bases, offers an alternative supply, and reduced dependence on (often) unreliable transportation corridors and partners.

    3. Emissions reduction. The Department of Defense is the world's largest single customer of diesel fuels.

    4. Independent energy supply. The US military has described its limited capacity to wage extended wars without access to foreign oilfields unless alternative energy sources can be developed and tapped.

    Here are 17 steps the US military forces are taking to advance, use and advocate for biofuels:

    1. In Maryland, the Naval Air Systems Command is preparing to test biofuels in an F/A-18 Super Hornet by next summer, according to Aero News. The Navy has issued an RFP for JP-5 jet fuel made from biomass, and has stipulated that it be made from non-food feedstocks, pointing the RFP towards algae, jatropha and camelina.

    2. In Washington, the US Navy and the US Department of Agriculture announced a partnership that will bring USDA science and scientists to the Navy's effort to develop a "sustainable, cost effective energy infrastructure," through development of synthetic fuels and energy efficiencies. According to a report in the Navy Times, the Navy paid $424 per gallon for a batch of algal-based biofuels, for testing purposes, purchased from Solazyme.

    3. In Washington, the US Air Force has ordered a total of 400,000 gallons of renewable biofuels from Sustainable Oils, Cargill and Solazyme for testing as a military aviation fuel. the companies, in turn, will use UOP's processing technology to convert oil from camelina, algae and animal fats into renewable jet fuel.

    4. In California, the U.S. Navy, Biodiesel Industries and Aerojet announced that they have successfully successfully demonstrated their ARIES (Automated Real-time, Remote, Integrated Energy System) project – a highly automated, portable biodiesel production unit that can be controlled from a remote location.

    5. In Washington, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration (DARPA) said that it is working on converting algae, cellulosic biomass, and yellow grease into biofuels, but warned that it may not be able to use commercial aviation biofuels because of the performance characteristics, such as performance in cold conditions. DARPA said it wanted to develop biofuels for ground vehicles and non-nuclear ships.

    6. In Alabama, the US Navy tested its new 125 foot Bullet airship that will operate on algae fuel supplied by Alabama's Unified Fuels. The surveillance airship, which will operate at a 15000 foot altitude and fly a 1,000 pound payload for up to 48 hours, will be used for border patrol, firefighting, port screening as well as other defense purposes.

    7. In Canada, Medicago announced a contract with the US Army to develop industrial enzymes for biofuels. "The high cost of enzymes is a major hurdle in the production of biofuels using biomass. We believe our manufacturing platform could be suitable for the production of affordable enzymes as plants are uniquely capable of efficient protein expression at high yields and low costs," said Louis Vezina, Medicago's chief scientific officer.

    8. In the UK, QinetiQ has been awarded $2.4 million, three year contract for a PyTEC containerized Pyrolysis Waste Disposal System for the US Army. The self sustaining thermal pyrolysis system will process up to 100kg of Municipal Solid Waste per hour, and reclaims up to 500 kW of the thermal energy from the waste per hour. The system will be fully commissioned by 2012 after field testing.

    9. In Michigan, Alternative Fuel Technologies announced that it will partner with the US Army to test jet fuel (JP-8) in a high pressure (30,000 psi) diesel fuel injection system. The test will utilize the company's proprietary DME fuel, a clean diesel fuel replacement that can be produced from natural gas, landfill methane, coal and biomass.

    10 In Washington, the Defense Energy Support Center and Air Transport Association of America signed a strategic alliance for the development and deployment of alternative aviation fuels. The DESC-ATA alliance brings together shared goals of the Department of Defense and the principle U.S. airlines to advance the development and deployment of commercially viable, environmentally friendly, alternative aviation fuels.

    11. In Washington, the special assistant for energy at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), which has been conducting two algal fuels projects, said that "Darpa has achieved the base goal to date. Oil from algae is projected at $2 per gallon, headed towards $1 per gallon."

    12. Wesley Clark: "We suffer the inefficiencies of cartel pricing and oil shocks… Then there is the military cost to ensure steady access to foreign oil from parts of the world that are volatile, or outright hostile to Western values and policies. Taxpayers fund the defense of oil shipping routes with an estimated annual cost of more than $50 billion. What does ethanol offer us to solve this dilemma? The domestic production of nearly 6.5 billion gallons of ethanol in the United States in 2007 eliminated the need to import at least 228.2 million barrels of oil for gasoline."

    13. In Washington, the Department of the Navy outlined its biofuels goals.  By 2012, the demonstration of its new, fossil-fuel independent Green Strike Group, using hybrid electric-diesel systems, nuclear power, and biofuels powering both fleet and aircraft. By 2016 — put the Group to sail in a demonstration of US military power – independent of the geopolitics of oil — in a show of power reminiscent of 1907's Great White Fleet. The Navy's 2020 goal – across land and sea operations, is to cut fossil fuel usage by half.

    14. In Washington, Deloitte released a new report "Energy Security – America's Best Defense," finding a 175 percent increase in gallons of fuel used per day, per United States soldier during wartime since the Vietnam conflict. The report provides recommendations for consideration by the U.S. Department of Defense for becoming more energy efficient and energy secure. Recommendations include: Common biofuels for aircraft and large horsepower engines; Hybrid/electrical/biofuel – technology for the next generation of ground vehicles (which will also include built-in, multi-use generators as a common feature) must be developed and implemented. A copy of the full report can be obtained here.

    15. The New York Times highlighted the effort at Covanta Energy to use the AlphaKet technology to convert military waste biomass to renewable diesel, using a  catalytic depolymerization process.

    16. In Washington, Senator John Kerry wrote in the Huffington Post: "Make no mistake: catastrophic climate change represents a threat to human security, global stability, and — yes — even to American national security." He echoes a report, downloadable, from the Military Advisory Board , that describes climate change as "a threat multiplier for instability in some of the most volatile regions of the world." The Board recommends that "the Department of Defense should enhance its operational capability by accelerating the adoption of improved business processes and innovative technologies that result in improved U.S. combat power through energy efficiency."

    17. The Air Force, Navy, DARPA and the Defense Department have all been sponsoring projects or looking at algal fuel acquisition. DOD has two projects – one led by General Atomics and the other by SAIC, which have a goal of producing $3 fuel. The Air Force has been at work in the Boeing-led jet fuel certification process. Most recently, the US Navy's Mid Atlantic Coast section said it is looking to put out RFPs for 30-year contracts to produce biomass and/or fuel on Navy property.

  • FUENTE:
    Saludos,
     
    RODRIGO  GONZALEZ  FERNANDEZ
    DIPLOMADO EN RSE DE LA ONU
    DIPLOMADO EN GESTION DEL CONOCIMIMIENTO DE ONU
    Renato Sánchez 3586, of 10 teléfono: 56-2451113
    Celular: 93934521
    WWW.CONSULTAJURIDICA.BLOGSPOT.COM
    SANTIAGO-CHILE
    Solicite nuestros cursos y asesoría en Responsabilidad social empresarial-Lobby corporativo-Energías renovables. Calentamiento Global- Gestión del conocimiento-Liderazgo,Energias Renovables.(Para OTEC, Universidades, Organizaciones )

    Árboles que generan energía limpia: Anémona vitifolia, la especie vegetal utilizada

    Árboles que generan energía limpia

    Anémona vitifolia, la especie vegetal utilizada en los ensayos

    Investigadores de la Universidad de Shangai Jiaotong en China, quienes durante años han estado analizando las propiedades de la fotosíntesis de las plantas, lograron crear una estrategia de diseño para obtener una hoja artificial que podría ser utilizada para dividir el agua en sus partes componentes: hidrógeno y oxígeno. El enfoque de los científicos en China está centrado en una hoja inorgánica artificial basada en una planta inyectada con partículas de dióxido de titanio para producir hidrógeno. El concepto busca aprovechar los procesos químicos y biológicos de las hojas naturales y, según los investigadores, podría conducir a un dispositivo que capture energía solar y produzca energía "limpia".

    La fotosíntesis es un proceso altamente eficiente que se produce en las hojas de los árboles cuando la energía solar cae sobre ellas y convierten esa energía luminosa en energía química utilizando dióxido de carbono y agua. Uno de los subproductos resultantes de este proceso es el oxígeno. Con este trabajo que están llevando a cabo los científicos chinos, se espera obtener la separación de las partes que componen el agua y aprovechar el hidrógeno para utilizarlo como fuente de energía. El hidrógeno podría ser utilizado como un combustible "limpio" ya que sólo emite vapor de agua durante su combustión, a diferencia de los derivados de petróleo o el carbón que liberan dióxido de carbono, principal gas de efecto invernadero. El reto siempre ha sido superar la barrera que significan los altos costos de una producción efectiva de hidrógeno.

    Visto en Neoteo: Árboles que generan energía limpia
    La fotosíntesis absorbe el dióxido de carbono y lo devuelve como agua y oxígeno
    La fotosíntesis absorbe el dióxido de carbono y lo devuelve como agua y oxígeno

    El estudio de los científicos en China está centrado en una hoja inorgánica artificial basada en una planta alterada mediante la inyección controlada de partículas de dióxido de titanio para producir cantidades significativas de hidrógeno. "Este concepto podría ofrecer una nueva visión en el diseño de sistemas artificiales fotosintéticos basados en ejemplos biológicos para la construcción de un prototipo de trabajo que explote los recursos de energía sostenible", afirma el doctor Tongxiang Fan, quien dirigió el estudio. Los científicos primero inyectaron dióxido de titanio en hojas de una especie llamada Anemona vitifolia  (una planta nativa de China) en un proceso de dos pasos. Luego, utilizando técnicas avanzadas de espectroscopía, los investigadores confirmaron que las características estructurales de estas "nuevas" hojas favorecían la recolección y aprovechamiento de la luz y descubrieron que esta nueva variedad resultante de hojas era ocho veces más activa en la producción de hidrógeno que el propio titanio.

    Visto en Neoteo: Árboles que generan energía limpia
    Anémona vitifolia, la especie vegetal utilizada en los ensayos
    Anémona vitifolia, la especie vegetal utilizada en los ensayos

    Según los científicos, los resultados iniciales representan un primer paso importante hacia la construcción del prototipo de una hoja artificial. Tal como señala el doctor Fan, "la naturaleza todavía tiene mucho que enseñarnos y el ingenio humano es capaz de modificar los principios de los sistemas naturales para mejorar su utilidad". Desde hace cuatro décadas, en el ambiente científico se ha extendido el interés por la creación de sistemas artificiales que imiten a la fotosíntesis. Con frecuencia, lo que se hace es reemplazar a la clorofila por una amalgama de compuestos químicos, ya sean orgánicos o inorgánicos, que tienen la capacidad de captar la luz. Sin embargo, se desconoce lo que se debe hacer y cómo se debe manipular a los electrones liberados en el proceso fotosintético. Según los informes de los resultados, con esta planta "dopada" por los científicos chinos, las perspectivas son prometedoras y los investigadores son optimistas a la hora de avanzar hacia un nuevo concepto en la generación de energías más limpias y eficientes.


    Enlaces relacionados:
    Visto en Neoteo: Árboles que generan energía limpia
    Noticia: BBC Mundo

    Technorati Tags:          
    Tags Blogalaxia:          
    FUENTE:
    Saludos,
     
    RODRIGO  GONZALEZ  FERNANDEZ
    DIPLOMADO EN RSE DE LA ONU
    DIPLOMADO EN GESTION DEL CONOCIMIMIENTO DE ONU
    Renato Sánchez 3586, of 10 teléfono: 56-2451113
    Celular: 93934521
    WWW.CONSULTAJURIDICA.BLOGSPOT.COM
    SANTIAGO-CHILE
    Solicite nuestros cursos y asesoría en Responsabilidad social empresarial-Lobby corporativo-Energías renovables. Calentamiento Global- Gestión del conocimiento-Liderazgo,Energias Renovables.(Para OTEC, Universidades, Organizaciones )

    Antropoceno: Entrando en una nueva era

    Antropoceno: Entrando en una nueva era

    ¿Ha sido activa tu participación en el evento que se dio a conocer alrededor de todo el mundo como "La hora del planeta"? Unas 3700 ciudades, en 125 países, se sumaron de manera activa a ser protagonistas para intentar evitar la llegada de una nueva era o período geológico: El Antropoceno. Algunos afirman que ya es tarde, que es irreversible y que estamos en sus inicios; otros toman la bandera de la esperanza y se aferran al Holoceno con actividades que intentan salvar a la humanidad de una extinción en masa catastrófica, comparable a cualquiera de las anteriores cinco grandes pérdidas de especies y organismos durante el pasado geológico de la Tierra.

    Los seres humanos han producido cambios tan inmensos y sin precedentes en el planeta que pueden estar marcando el comienzo de un nuevo período de la historia geológica. Entre las causas figuran la contaminación, el crecimiento demográfico, la urbanización, los viajes y traslados de grupos humanos hacia zonas vírgenes formando nuevas ciudades, la minería y el uso de combustibles fósiles que han alterado el planeta de una manera considerable. Este hecho, estiman los expertos, se dejará sentir durante millones de años. Se teme que la humanidad ha infligido daños que darán lugar a la sexta extinción en masa más grande en la historia de la Tierra, con el agregado de miles de nuevas especies de plantas y animales, además de las que ya estaban en vías de desaparición.

    La nueva era, llamada Antropoceno (del griego "antropo"= humano y "keinos"= nuevo) sería el primer período de tiempo geológico creado por la acción directa de una sola especie animal. Yendo hacia atrás en el tiempo, hace 58 millones de años se estima que terminó el Paleoceno y se dio inicio al Eoceno (del griego "eos"=aurora). Durante este período ocurrió un evento que cambiaría a la Tierra y que se debió también a una sola especie, en este caso de origen vegetal: una planta llamada azolla. La azolla es un helecho de agua fresca que se asocia con una bacteria (la "Cianobacteria anabaena") que tiene una característica sobresaliente: la eficiente fijación del nitrógeno y el carbono. En esta combinación, cada 4 mil metros cuadrados de azolla pueden "atrapar" en un año una tonelada de nitrógeno y seis toneladas de carbono. Cuando se dan condiciones favorables, la azolla crece muy rápido y con 20 horas de sol puede duplicar su biomasa en tres días o menos.

    Visto en Neoteo: Antropoceno: Entrando en una nueva era
    Un inocente helecho provocó uno de los cambios geológicos más importantes en el planeta
    Un inocente helecho provocó uno de los cambios geológicos más importantes en el planeta

    En el Eoceno las condiciones eran muy favorables para la azolla, sobre todo en el Polo Norte donde hacía calor, y además durante el verano estaba expuesta constantemente al sol. El crecimiento de la azolla comenzó a disminuir el dióxido de carbono de la atmósfera. El registro fósil muestra que en el transcurso de 800 mil años los niveles de CO2 en la atmósfera bajaron de 3.500 partes por millón (ppm) (al principio del Eoceno) hasta 650 ppm. Conocido por los paleontólogos como el Evento Azolla, el cambio atmosférico originado por el crecimiento explosivo de este helecho inició el enfriamiento global que duró hasta el Pleistoceno ("pleisto"=mucho) donde aparecieron y se extinguieron muchas especies de mamíferos gigantes y hasta apareció nuestro antepasado directo, el "Homo Erectus". Este período, el Pleistoceno finalizó hace aproximadamente 11 mil años, cuando se retiraron los hielos, para dar lugar al Holoceno ("holo"=todo) con la flora y la fauna que hoy habita nuestro planeta.

    Aunque el término Antropoceno ha sido utilizado de manera informal entre los científicos por más de una década, es ahora considerado un término oficial. Un nuevo grupo de trabajo de expertos ha sido creado para reunir todas las pruebas que apoyen el reconocimiento del Antropoceno como el sucesor de la actual época del Holoceno. Se espera que dentro de tres años, este caso sea presentado en la Unión Internacional de Ciencias Geológicas, que decidirá si la transición a una nueva época se ha iniciado o no. La teoría ha sido propuesta por un grupo de científicos, como Paul Crutzen, premio Nobel de Química en 1995, en la revista Environmental Science & Technology. Los expertos llegaron a la siguiente conclusión: "El Antropoceno representa una nueva etapa en la historia tanto de la humanidad como de la Tierra misma, ya que al combinar las fuerzas naturales y las fuerzas humanas, el destino de una está determinando el destino de la otra. Geológicamente, este es un episodio importante en la historia de este planeta".

    Visto en Neoteo: Antropoceno: Entrando en una nueva era
    El inicio del Holoceno se identifica con la retirada de los hielos y la proliferación de las especies que hoy conocemos
    El inicio del Holoceno se identifica con la retirada de los hielos y la proliferación de las especies que hoy conocemos

    El Dr. Jan Zalasiewicz, de la Universidad de Leicester, coautor del documento, añadió: "Se sugiere que estamos en el tren de producción de una extinción en masa catastrófica capaz de rivalizar con las anteriores cinco grandes pérdidas de especies y organismos durante el pasado geológico de la Tierra". Hoy la preocupación inmediata es las emisiones de dióxido de carbono que está causando un lento pero incesante calentamiento global. Pero no es la única huella por la que de aquí a varios miles de años los arqueólogos reconocerán al Antropoceno. Además del cambio climático, mucho más brutal que el causado por la azolla, encontrarán miles de millones de toneladas de concreto, plásticos y residuos tóxicos. El Antropoceno será una de las épocas geológicas más claramente marcadas y todo parece indicar que la más corta en la historia de la Tierra. Una época que muchos niegan y se resisten a recibir intentando cada día una nueva actividad que genere conciencia y ponga freno a este suicidio masivo en el que estamos todos embarcados. Por todo esto, ¿participaste de La hora del Planeta? Cuéntanos tu experiencia.


    Enlaces relacionados:
    Visto en Neoteo: Antropoceno: Entrando en una nueva era
    Noticia: Telegraph
    Bibliografía: El Comercio

    Technorati Tags:              
    Tags Blogalaxia:              
    FUENTE: neoteo
    Saludos,
     
    RODRIGO  GONZALEZ  FERNANDEZ
    DIPLOMADO EN RSE DE LA ONU
    DIPLOMADO EN GESTION DEL CONOCIMIMIENTO DE ONU
    Renato Sánchez 3586, of 10 teléfono: 56-2451113
    Celular: 93934521
    WWW.CONSULTAJURIDICA.BLOGSPOT.COM
    SANTIAGO-CHILE
    Solicite nuestros cursos y asesoría en Responsabilidad social empresarial-Lobby corporativo-Energías renovables. Calentamiento Global- Gestión del conocimiento-Liderazgo,Energias Renovables.(Para OTEC, Universidades, Organizaciones )